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ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | November 6, 2009
After spending more than a decade in the local art world, writing a novel loosely based on her experiences was a natural next step for local Nora Novak. “The Devil Wears Prada” meets the contemporary art world in “Art Damaged,” Novak’s debut novel, which was released last month. Novak will sign the book Saturday on Balboa Island and later this month in Costa Mesa. “This is a glimpse into the behind-the-scenes of the contemporary art world, and it follows the life of an artist in a fictional upscale beach community in Orange County,” Novak said; she called the community Emerald Beach.
NEWS
February 4, 2005
Paul Saitowitz The kid from a broken home with a busted tooth and a battered spirit splattering graffiti-like images over a skateboard rife with dents and dings from grinding on gutters never strove to be taken seriously as an artist. The established art world is littered with academics preoccupied with explaining the polemics of different periods and movements from days of yore to even recognize his art ... and anyway he doesn't give a rip. Street art -- by way of skaters, punkers, hip-hoppers and street kids with spray paint, cameras, pencils, house paint, chalk and discarded junkyard parts -- has been steadily growing for more than a decade on cities' outskirts throughout the world.
NEWS
November 2, 2000
-- Story by Mathis Winkler HE IS Guarding the masters AN OBVIOUS JOB CHOICE An artist, Laurie was looking for a job in the art world in 1991 when he came across work as an installer at the Newport Harbor Museum of Art. He hung paintings and helped set up sculptures for exhibitions. But because he had to bridge long breaks between shows, Laurie, now 53, also began working as a security guard at the museum. A few years later, when the museum became the Orange County Museum of Art, he was offered a full-time position as a security guard, "which I gladly agreed to, having three children at the time to feed," he said.
BUSINESS
By Amanda Pennington | April 9, 2007
Fred Page says he realized his love of art in college when he began his art collection. He then became fully invested when stationed in the Navy in Newport, R.I., where he bought his first Picasso print. The print came at a price — it took him about two years to pay for it, but he said it was worth it. He still has his Picasso, and now he's in the business of selling art, too. Page recently opened a new Costa Mesa gallery, the Grace Lane Gallery, off Baker Street and Fairview Road.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | June 25, 2008
“Not to be shocking means to agree to be furniture.” Scrawled in an upper corner of an Orange County Museum of Art hallway, the phrase suits the times, as three new art shows bring the scandalous, the avant-garde and the satirical to Orange County. The Orange County Museum of Art has launched a major new retrospective of the works of Peter Saul, compiled from the past several decades. Saul is a controversial pioneer of pop art whose works, called “sick jokes” by Robert Storr, the curator and dean of the Yale School of Art, inspired legions of fans.
FEATURES
By Alicia Robinson | September 23, 2006
CORONA DEL MAR — Nine-year-old Ben Palitz lives in a world of color. He's a child of many interests, a Renaissance boy: He's a skater and surfer, he plays piano, he throws a mean softball, and he paints. That's where the color comes in. Ben has painted vividly colored hamburgers and ice cream cones. In one portrait, an orange cat smiles next to a mauve dog. His favorite picture is a turkey with a rainbow of feathers. His philosophy is simple: "If you don't do a lot of colors, it makes it boring.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jessie Brunner | August 15, 2007
For the past 20 years, Shawn Michael Droke has held numerous occupations, but his avocation has always been the same. He's waited tables, landscaped gardens and sold women's shoes all in the hope of saving enough to open his own art gallery. Last week, the 41-year-old realized his dream. "I did anything to make money so I could keep doing my art," Droke said. "It's taken me a long time, but now I am finally at the point where I can just do my art." With dozens of acrylic paintings on display, the modern realist's ambitions extend beyond the walls of his Cannery Village studio.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters | February 23, 2012
Although never intended to be abstract landscapes, works in "Richard Diebenkorn: The Ocean Park Series" impart a sense of coastal Southern California light and atmosphere. Eighty works are going on display at the Orange County Museum of Art on Sunday in a show that will run there through May 27. It is the most comprehensive Diebenkorn exhibit to hit the art scene to date, OCMA Curator Sarah Bancroft said. "It's his most celebrated series, but very few people have seen it in-depth" Bancroft said of Diebenkorn's pieces, which span from 1967 to 1988 and originate from his Santa Monica Ocean Park studio.
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 15, 2012
Dave Rahn straddles two worlds. One is defined by numbers, losses, gains and the intricacies of investments. The other does not rely on mathematical precision: It is the world of art. The 61-year-old president of First Foundation Bank is both a banker and an artist, able to intermingle both traits as an executive and overseer of the bank's Art Services division. The banking world is "filled with people who don't understand art, and all they're trying to do is turn a dime," he said.
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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | November 15, 2012
Dave Rahn straddles two worlds. One is defined by numbers, losses, gains and the intricacies of investments. The other does not rely on mathematical precision: It is the world of art. The 61-year-old president of First Foundation Bank is both a banker and an artist, able to intermingle both traits as an executive and overseer of the bank's Art Services division. The banking world is "filled with people who don't understand art, and all they're trying to do is turn a dime," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By B.W. Cook | June 20, 2012
It is the most sophisticated social event of the year in Orange County. Art of Dining 2012, the Orange County Museum of Art's annual fundraising gala, honored Los Angeles art dealer Irving Blum , a visionary collector and exhibitor of contemporary art. The debonair Blum, director and co-owner of the internationally recognized Ferus Gallery, was honored for a career that has spanned more than 50 years and championed the likes of American...
NEWS
By Sarah Peters | February 23, 2012
Although never intended to be abstract landscapes, works in "Richard Diebenkorn: The Ocean Park Series" impart a sense of coastal Southern California light and atmosphere. Eighty works are going on display at the Orange County Museum of Art on Sunday in a show that will run there through May 27. It is the most comprehensive Diebenkorn exhibit to hit the art scene to date, OCMA Curator Sarah Bancroft said. "It's his most celebrated series, but very few people have seen it in-depth" Bancroft said of Diebenkorn's pieces, which span from 1967 to 1988 and originate from his Santa Monica Ocean Park studio.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | November 6, 2009
After spending more than a decade in the local art world, writing a novel loosely based on her experiences was a natural next step for local Nora Novak. “The Devil Wears Prada” meets the contemporary art world in “Art Damaged,” Novak’s debut novel, which was released last month. Novak will sign the book Saturday on Balboa Island and later this month in Costa Mesa. “This is a glimpse into the behind-the-scenes of the contemporary art world, and it follows the life of an artist in a fictional upscale beach community in Orange County,” Novak said; she called the community Emerald Beach.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candice Baker | June 25, 2008
“Not to be shocking means to agree to be furniture.” Scrawled in an upper corner of an Orange County Museum of Art hallway, the phrase suits the times, as three new art shows bring the scandalous, the avant-garde and the satirical to Orange County. The Orange County Museum of Art has launched a major new retrospective of the works of Peter Saul, compiled from the past several decades. Saul is a controversial pioneer of pop art whose works, called “sick jokes” by Robert Storr, the curator and dean of the Yale School of Art, inspired legions of fans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jessie Brunner | August 15, 2007
For the past 20 years, Shawn Michael Droke has held numerous occupations, but his avocation has always been the same. He's waited tables, landscaped gardens and sold women's shoes all in the hope of saving enough to open his own art gallery. Last week, the 41-year-old realized his dream. "I did anything to make money so I could keep doing my art," Droke said. "It's taken me a long time, but now I am finally at the point where I can just do my art." With dozens of acrylic paintings on display, the modern realist's ambitions extend beyond the walls of his Cannery Village studio.
BUSINESS
By Amanda Pennington | April 9, 2007
Fred Page says he realized his love of art in college when he began his art collection. He then became fully invested when stationed in the Navy in Newport, R.I., where he bought his first Picasso print. The print came at a price — it took him about two years to pay for it, but he said it was worth it. He still has his Picasso, and now he's in the business of selling art, too. Page recently opened a new Costa Mesa gallery, the Grace Lane Gallery, off Baker Street and Fairview Road.
FEATURES
By Alicia Robinson | September 23, 2006
CORONA DEL MAR — Nine-year-old Ben Palitz lives in a world of color. He's a child of many interests, a Renaissance boy: He's a skater and surfer, he plays piano, he throws a mean softball, and he paints. That's where the color comes in. Ben has painted vividly colored hamburgers and ice cream cones. In one portrait, an orange cat smiles next to a mauve dog. His favorite picture is a turkey with a rainbow of feathers. His philosophy is simple: "If you don't do a lot of colors, it makes it boring.
NEWS
February 4, 2005
Paul Saitowitz The kid from a broken home with a busted tooth and a battered spirit splattering graffiti-like images over a skateboard rife with dents and dings from grinding on gutters never strove to be taken seriously as an artist. The established art world is littered with academics preoccupied with explaining the polemics of different periods and movements from days of yore to even recognize his art ... and anyway he doesn't give a rip. Street art -- by way of skaters, punkers, hip-hoppers and street kids with spray paint, cameras, pencils, house paint, chalk and discarded junkyard parts -- has been steadily growing for more than a decade on cities' outskirts throughout the world.
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