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By By Lindsay Sandham | November 5, 2005
Research, studies and new drugs encourage seniors diagnosed with or suffering the disease.The number of cases of Alzheimer's disease in the United States could more than double in the next 50 years, but great strides are being made in studies of the disease, research shows. Dr. Carl Cotman, executive director of UC Irvine's Institute for Brain Aging and Dementia, discussed some of the recent studies and findings Thursday in a presentation titled "Delaying Alzheimer's Disease: Behavioral, Dietary and Pharmacological Interventions."
NEWS
October 25, 2002
Alzheimer's disease causes progressive, irreversible decline in mental functioning -- destroying memory, judgment and ability to reason. Community and social resources are available to ease the difficulties of families caring for a victim of Alzheimer's disease. One such resource is Aliso Laguna Village -- a specialized dementia residence dedicated to the care of persons with Alzheimer's, dementia and other forms of memory loss. Aliso Laguna Village's unique, multi-levels of care promotes social interaction in a resort-like setting and enables quality programming throughout all stages of memory loss.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
An 85-year-old woman who was reported missing has been found, police said. Carol Ann Morrow was found about 11 a.m. near Jamboree Road and University Drive, not far from her East Bluff home, by a lifeguard who was driving in the area, said Newport police spokeswoman Kathy Lowe. Police were searching for Morrow since she went missing about 10 p.m. Monday from her home in the 2800 block of Catalpa Street, Lowe said Tuesday. —Lauren Williams
NEWS
December 11, 2001
People with Down syndrome may hold the key to treating Alzheimer's disease in its earliest stages, according to a UC Irvine medical study released Monday. The study, which was conducted on patients with Down syndrome who died with Alzheimer's disease, shows that the earliest brain changes of Alzheimer's may be seen in childhood. It also indicates that antioxidants could possibly be used to help prevent or slow the development of the disease in people with Down syndrome and the general population.
NEWS
September 27, 2002
At Silverado, your loved one with Alzheimer's will be actively involved in living. We feel strongly that our mission is to provide meaning, purpose and quality in each of our residents' lives. We have successfully combined a social model of care integrated with professional nursing services. By including pets, plants and children in our community, we have been able to create a home-like environment. Through our 24-hour, on-site nursing care and activity programming, we are able to meet the full spectrum of needs of the folks who live with us. Silverado is proud to be a participant in the Orange County Alzheimer's Association Memory Walk 2002 on Saturday, Oct. 5. If you would like to join the Silverado/Newport-Mesa team and help raise funds for Alzheimer's research, contact Patti Struthers at (949)
NEWS
August 5, 2004
Alzheimer's might be detectable earlier Researchers at UC Irvine found the first evidence that early treatment can halt the progression of Alzheimer's disease. Treatment of a certain type of brain lesion with specific antibodies, neurobiologists found that they could reverse abnormalities from another type of brain lesion, UCI officials said. That halted progression of the disease, researchers Frank LaFerla Salvatore Oddo, Lauren Billings, J. Patrick Kesslak and David H. Cribbs wrote in their paper.
FEATURES
By B.W. COOK | May 18, 2006
Organizers called the dinner meeting a Gathering of Friends. It was much more. Adult Day Services of Orange County attracted more than 400 guests to the Turnip Rose in Costa Mesa to honor people with Alzheimer's disease and to pay tribute to the work of Adult Day Services in partnership with Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian. Led by Executive Director Cordula Dick-Muehlke, Adult Day Services is a residential care facility in Huntington Beach that offers comprehensive support for Alzheimer's patients and their families.
LOCAL
November 29, 2006
A fire Tuesday afternoon at an assisted-living facility forced the evacuation of most of its patients, including many with Alzheimer's disease, but no one was hurt in the blaze. At 4:13 p.m., an automatic fire alarm sent Newport Beach firefighters to Avalon at Newport, an assisted-living facility and Alzheimer's community across the street from Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian, fire officials said. Avalon workers helped about 50 of the 80 seniors in the facility out of the building, fire officials said.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | January 13, 2012
During the last years of my father's life, he slowly, agonizingly slipped away from me. A proud and stoic man who had survived a heartbreakingly unhappy childhood, economic depression and a world war fell at last to the ravages of dementia. Helpless and childlike, his memory shattered along with his dignity — the personal quality he prized above all others — he was no longer the father I knew. All I could do was watch until the day when the inevitable phone call came, letting me know that Dad was gone.
ENTERTAINMENT
By B.W. Cook | March 30, 2012
They called it the "Time of Your Life. " The UCI Mind Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders took the crowd back to the psychedelic 1960s to raise funds forAlzheimer'sresearch at the institute. And raise funds they did. Some 500 guests replicating the Twiggy mini skirt for the ladies and the Nehru jacket for the men converged upon Costa Mesa's Center Club for a fabulous party that was non-stop energy. Organizers decorated the Center Club in sectors that included a Motown Room, a British Invasion corner, a Beach Boys surf's up lounge, a TV Land living room suitable for the Cleaver family of "Leave it to Beaver" fame, a Sinatra swinging Supper Club and finally a "futurama" view of the "new age" fit for the Jetsons.
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NEWS
March 28, 2014
Surrounded by loved ones, following the reading of Romans 8:35, 37-39, Billie “Teenie” Moody Rice transitioned from this life to the next in a delicate, peaceful way. In her final moments, she heard reassuring words from her children, a family prayer, and the hymn, Amazing Grace. Teenie ended a long battle with Alzheimer's Disease on the evening of March 17th. Born in Groesbeck on September 18, 1926 to Guy and Bonnie Moody, Teenie grew up in Central Texas. She met and married Inman “Windell” Rice upon his completion of Naval Service during WW II. The Rice's immigrated to California in the 50's, where they raised their two sons, Rob and Chris.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Miller | February 27, 2014
In the 1950s classic "Roll Over Beethoven," Chuck Berry declares, "I got the rockin' pneumonia / I need a shot of rhythm and blues / I caught the rollin' arthritis / sitting down at a rhythm review. " The day may never come when music can cure pneumonia or arthritis. Still, Christopher Duma has witnessed other cases where a well-chosen tune can alleviate a medical condition. The Newport Beach doctor has watched a Parkinson's patient put pegs in holes faster with the help of rhythm.
NEWS
December 19, 2013
Raymond Fredrick Hitzel Raymond Fredrick Hitzel passed away peacefully at home on Saturday, November 2, 2013. Born in Chicago, Illinois on February 25, 1920, Ray attended Lions Township High School where he excelled in athletics.  Ray went on to play football for Marquette University and Arizona State University.  Ray served as a Second Lieutenant in WWII and was a POW in Germany where he was decorated with a Battle Stars Ribbon.  After...
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | September 20, 2013
More than 5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease, including 75,000 in Orange County. By mid-century, those numbers could nearly triple, according to current projections. That's a frightening prospect. Most of us know someone who has suffered from this cruel, heart-wrenching disease, and have witnessed firsthand how it robs its victims of their memories and reasoning capacity, erasing the very essence of self as brains literally waste away. But the scary projections are also motivating some medical researchers to work furiously to find ways to stop the disease, or at least delay its progress.
NEWS
By Jamie Rowe | December 21, 2012
Buddy Belshe, a lifeguard who retired after 58 years, most of them working in Newport Beach, has died. He was 78. Belshe, who started out as a lifeguard in Huntington Beach just before his 16th birthday, had suffered from Alzheimer's disease, according to Corona del Mar Today, which was first to report that he had died Wednesday. He originally thought about being a physical education or biology teacher, but the waters kept calling him, he said in previous Daily Pilot articles.
NEWS
By Brittany Woolsey | September 25, 2012
A group of UC Irvine scientists have contributed to an international study that could help researchers develop medicines for brain conditions. After studying two-and-a-half male human brains, the Seattle-based Allen Institute for Brain Science and the UCI team found evidence that human brains may be more similar to each other than they are dissimilar, despite differences in personalities and talents among individuals. "The strength of this study is not the number of human brains we looked at, but the different parts of the brain in one or two people," said Marquis Vawter, research associate professor of psychiatry and human behavior at UCI. FOR THE RECORD: An earlier version of this story incorrectly had Vawter's first name as Marcus.
NEWS
April 20, 2012
Joyce Wyatt Joyce, a native Californian born in Pomona 9/29/1931, to Edwin and Mae Masturzo. Diagnosed in 2005 with Alzheimer's she fought a great battle but finally lost to the unforgiving, debilitating disease 4/15/2012. She grew up in Camarillo and graduated from Oxnard HS in 1949. While attending Ventura JC she met her husband Bob and they were married in 1951.  They have lived in Costa Mesa since 1961. She loved her sports and played tennis with a great group of “ladies” even after diagnosis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By B.W. Cook | March 30, 2012
They called it the "Time of Your Life. " The UCI Mind Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders took the crowd back to the psychedelic 1960s to raise funds forAlzheimer'sresearch at the institute. And raise funds they did. Some 500 guests replicating the Twiggy mini skirt for the ladies and the Nehru jacket for the men converged upon Costa Mesa's Center Club for a fabulous party that was non-stop energy. Organizers decorated the Center Club in sectors that included a Motown Room, a British Invasion corner, a Beach Boys surf's up lounge, a TV Land living room suitable for the Cleaver family of "Leave it to Beaver" fame, a Sinatra swinging Supper Club and finally a "futurama" view of the "new age" fit for the Jetsons.
NEWS
By Patrice Apodaca | January 13, 2012
During the last years of my father's life, he slowly, agonizingly slipped away from me. A proud and stoic man who had survived a heartbreakingly unhappy childhood, economic depression and a world war fell at last to the ravages of dementia. Helpless and childlike, his memory shattered along with his dignity — the personal quality he prized above all others — he was no longer the father I knew. All I could do was watch until the day when the inevitable phone call came, letting me know that Dad was gone.
NEWS
June 14, 2011
An 85-year-old woman who was reported missing has been found, police said. Carol Ann Morrow was found about 11 a.m. near Jamboree Road and University Drive, not far from her East Bluff home, by a lifeguard who was driving in the area, said Newport police spokeswoman Kathy Lowe. Police were searching for Morrow since she went missing about 10 p.m. Monday from her home in the 2800 block of Catalpa Street, Lowe said Tuesday. —Lauren Williams
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