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Affordable Housing

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NEWS
By Joseph Serna | January 18, 2012
COSTA MESA — Forced to choose between handing to the county the responsibilities for the city's affordable housing or creating a city-run housing agency, the City Council on Tuesday elected to keep the responsibility in-house. The Costa Mesa Housing Authority will now oversee $9 million in affordable-housing accounts. The accounts used to belong to the city's redevelopment agency (RDA) until it was dissolved by Sacramento legislation, which cities challenged but the state Supreme Court upheld in December.
LOCAL
By STEVE SMITH | March 31, 2007
The easy thing to do is to look at last Tuesday's teacher protest before the school board meeting as an isolated incident. But that would be a mistake. In fact, a recent series of important events has led to a local crisis in education. Workplace disruptions such as this are almost always the result of bad management. That observation comes from having more than 20 years of experience managing people. Bad management is usually the result of poor communication, whether it is not enough communication or whether the words and actions don't match.
NEWS
September 4, 2013
After attending a recent Costa Mesa General Master Plan meeting, I was aghast at the levels of arrogance, ineptitude and offensiveness of the questions proposed, and the presentation in general. The presentation took on the form of an audience multiple-choice survey of futuristic proposals, primarily focusing on current "problematic motel" locations. Options offered were so limited and lacking in general public interest, and the obvious option of "none of the above" was conspicuously absent.
NEWS
By Jim Righeimer | July 12, 2012
I called Jean Forbath after her commentary (" Rent hikes at Bethel Towers will hurt seniors ," July 10) appeared in the Daily Pilot and told her that she had drawn the wrong conclusions from staff writer Joseph Serna's article about the City Council's recent approval of tax-free bonds to renovate Bethel Towers. As past chairman of the Orange County Housing Authority, I am very concerned with keeping affordable housing for our Costa Mesa seniors. From the facts presented in the story, Forbath concluded that the affordable housing operator that is looking to take over Bethel Towers would make only 20% of the 269 units affordable, creating a loss of 215 affordable senior housing units.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher | October 3, 2011
Agreeing to lift constraints on affordable housing development, Newport Beach officials have received tentative approval of the city's housing blueprint. Regulators from the state Department of Housing and Community Development said last month that the city's moves would bring it into compliance with state law. If the City Council adopts the plan next month, affordable housing developments near John Wayne Airport would be automatically approved if they meet certain requirements.
NEWS
June 13, 2012
Costa Mesa's nest egg to eventually buy local problem motels doubled Tuesday when the city's housing authority approved setting aside $660,000 in federal money. Described as seed money by Neighborhood Improvement Manager Muriel Ullman, the allocation can be combined with $500,000 in general fund money the City Council wants to set aside in the next fiscal year. The federal dollars are surplus from another redevelopment project Costa Mesa ended this year, Ullman said, and had to be used for affordable housing.
NEWS
By Mike Reicher, mike.reicher@latimes.com | April 28, 2011
NEWPORT BEACH — When the federal government doles out grants to help low- and moderate-income individuals, it has to make an exception for a city like Newport Beach. The majority of households here earn more than $80,000, and there are few pockets with people of even average means. So when the City Council approved its annual Community Development Block Grant funding this week, more than half the funds were able to pay for decorative sidewalks, street furniture, landscaping and other street improvements.
NEWS
December 17, 1999
Noaki Schwartz NEWPORT BEACH -- The city has fallen behind on the number of affordable houses it is required to build, and officials are trying to do something about it. "As it stands now, we have an affordable housing requirement, and we're trying to decide how to deal with that," said Mayor John Noyes. The state requires that about 20% of the total units built in the city be affordable, but the city has fallen beneath that due to recent losses of many inexpensive units as affordable housing agreements with landlords have expired.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Bradley Zint | April 29, 2014
The Costa Mesa Planning Commission examined a proposal Monday evening that could significantly reduce the number of allowable long-term motel tenants. Because the city has largely met its most recent requirement to provide affordable housing, "it is no longer essential to authorize long-term stays" at motels to satisfy that mandate, according to city staff. A state-mandated document called the Housing Element, which addresses citywide housing needs from 2013 to 2021, says Costa Mesa needs only two more low-income housing units.
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NEWS
By Bradley Zint | March 29, 2014
A proposed ordinance that would ease building requirements for small developments faces its second reading Tuesday before the Costa Mesa City Council. The Small-Lot Subdivision Ordinance would be applied to projects containing up to 15 units in areas already zoned for multi-family housing. City staff contends that the law would "promote affordable ownership housing by providing more flexible development standards" and other maintenance issues for underutilized, multifamily residential lots.
NEWS
By Jean Forbath | January 10, 2014
The article in Thursday's Daily Pilot gives a fairly comprehensive report on the City Council's action regarding charging motels for excessive calls from the Costa Mesa Police Department ["Motels to pay for excess police calls" ]. However, there are two issues that weren't mentioned: a real risk of costly lawsuits and the negative impact the ordinance will have on affordable housing for low-income people and families. Many speakers, including Councilwoman Sandra Genis, pointed out the discriminatory aspects of the ordinance — singling out one area of business (motels/hotels)
NEWS
By Hannah Fry | October 1, 2013
About 100 people, including top city officials, gathered Monday night to discuss a new community group's six-point plan to end homelessness in Costa Mesa within the next several years. The Costa Mesa Partnership to End Homelessness invited residents to The Crossing Church to discuss its strategy, which includes providing some type of affordable housing. Thirty-two people signed up to serve on six subcommittees focusing on research, immediate services, outreach, emergency shelter, housing placements and homelessness prevention, said Becks Heyhoe, director of the local Churches Consortium.
NEWS
By Ryan Esfahani | September 9, 2013
Anyone who pays attention to the doings of the Costa Mesa City Council knows that our city is busy updating its general plan. The press has covered the many public meetings, creative outreach efforts and road shows aimed at getting Costa Mesa residents involved in this communal act of visioning future development in the city. But, sadly, scant attention has been paid to a crucial part of the general plan update. With little press coverage or public input, the City Council is currently reviewing proposed revisions to the city's housing element, the road map for meeting the city's housing needs for the next seven years.
NEWS
September 4, 2013
After attending a recent Costa Mesa General Master Plan meeting, I was aghast at the levels of arrogance, ineptitude and offensiveness of the questions proposed, and the presentation in general. The presentation took on the form of an audience multiple-choice survey of futuristic proposals, primarily focusing on current "problematic motel" locations. Options offered were so limited and lacking in general public interest, and the obvious option of "none of the above" was conspicuously absent.
NEWS
May 20, 2013
The Costa Mesa City Council on Tuesday is scheduled to consider approving a loan of up to $500,000 to help pay for permanent housing for the city's homeless population. If approved by the council and the city's Housing Authority, which replaced the dissolved Redevelopment Agency, the amount would come from HOME funds that the city received in earlier years through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Money from the city's general fund could also be used. The federal funds help "fund a wide range of activities that build, buy and/or rehabilitate affordable housing for rent or homeownership or provide direct rental assistance to low-income people," according to HUD's website.
NEWS
By Rhea Mahbubani | May 17, 2013
Irvine Councilwoman Christina Shea's proposal to investigate and improve the housing situation for developmentally disabled residents drew applause - and unanimous approval - at Tuesday's meeting. This "vulnerable group" does not receive adequate aid, and this was confirmed at a recent Community Land Trust meeting, Shea said. "A group of residents did let us know that within Irvine, housing for the developmentally disabled is in short supply," she said. "And that affordable housing designed for those residents to use, in their words, is 'non-existent.'" Toward this end, she suggested creating a task force, but first city staff must: •Identify the scope of the current and future housing needs of the city's developmentally disabled population; •Summarize current housing policies; •Describe housing services others provide to serve the needs of these residents; •Provide the council with a list of possible solutions, if inadequacies are found; •Structure a task force that would convene and provide recommendations to the council for consideration.
NEWS
By Colin McCarthy | April 16, 2013
Re. "Harlan: Stop focusing on boosting homeownership," April 14: At first glance, I thought the title of Jeffrey Harlan's latest column was an editing error. I thought the headline would be, "We need to focus on boosting homeownership. " As an urban planner, I'm surprised that Harlan opposes efforts to increase homeownership in our city. While I appreciate his perspective, I couldn't disagree with him more. Costa Mesa consistently ranks dead last in percentage of ownership-to-rental units.
NEWS
By Jim Righeimer | July 12, 2012
I called Jean Forbath after her commentary (" Rent hikes at Bethel Towers will hurt seniors ," July 10) appeared in the Daily Pilot and told her that she had drawn the wrong conclusions from staff writer Joseph Serna's article about the City Council's recent approval of tax-free bonds to renovate Bethel Towers. As past chairman of the Orange County Housing Authority, I am very concerned with keeping affordable housing for our Costa Mesa seniors. From the facts presented in the story, Forbath concluded that the affordable housing operator that is looking to take over Bethel Towers would make only 20% of the 269 units affordable, creating a loss of 215 affordable senior housing units.
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