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Adoption

NEWS
June 23, 2012
More than a dozen dogs set to be euthanized began their journey to finding a permanent a home Saturday when the Newport Beach Plaza Retirement Community hosted its second annual pet adoption event. As part of a fundraiser for Stella's Hope - a nonprofit that finds dogs a foster home until they're permanently adopted so they avoid euthanization - the retirement community Saturday welcomed between 15 and 20 dogs for prospective owners to meet. None of the dogs are adopted at the event, retirement community spokeswoman Marilyn Williams said, but owners get to meet the animals and apply to have the dogs visit their home to see if it's a good fit. Williams said at least 13 applications had been submitted before Saturday's event had concluded.
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NEWS
By Lauren Williams | April 7, 2012
As with many of its votes, the Costa Mesa City Council adopted the Homeless Task Force's recommendations with a majority on one side and a single dissenter on the other. But this time, the rebel wasn't Councilwoman Wendy Leece, who often finds herself in the minority on the council dais. Instead, during the March 20 meeting she was part of the majority alongside Mayor Pro Tem Jim Righeimer and Councilman Steve Mensinger. Councilman Gary Monahan was absent from the 3-1 vote. "Wendy and I go way back," Righeimer said, adding that it shouldn't be surprising that they voted together on this issue.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna | February 9, 2012
The Costa Mesa City Council approved a reformed pension model for the city's nonpublic safety workers this week that could save the city millions compared in the long run, according to a city staff report. About 185 workers in the Costa Mesa City Employees Assn. (CMCEA), along with department supervisors, agreed to create a two-tier retirement plan. Current workers remain under the 2.5% at 55 years old formula, and employees hired after March 11 will be on a 2% at 60 plan. It would take longer for new city workers to max out their retirement benefits, and the new formula creates an incentive for them to work later into their career, city officials said in October when discussing retirement plans.
NEWS
January 24, 2012
ORLANDO, Fla. — These reader questions were answered by experts attending the North American Veterinary Conference here Jan.14-18. Question: We adopted a kitten from a shelter, and at only 7 months she already weighs 14 pounds. We feed her a half a can of canned food each morning and have dry food available all the time. Sparky even sleeps near the food bowl, and eats often. I believe she must have gone hungry before she came to us. To cut calories, I have switched to adult dry food.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Pat Bril | December 27, 2011
Winter is a sweet 9-year-old Maltese mix, given up recently by his owners who moved and could no longer care for him and Coco, his Golden Retriever companion. Coco has been adopted, and now Winter is eager to find a new home of his own. He is friendly with other dogs, comfortable around children, well-behaved on leash, responsive to basic commands, already neutered, and house trained. Despite losing his companion, he is not despondent; instead, he enjoys sunning himself in his kennel, playing with toys, and offering affection to all who meet him. Although there are many deserving dogs currently housed at the shelter, this "Winter's Tale" makes his case for adoption especially compelling.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Depko and Susanne Perez | November 3, 2011
The 1st Battalion, 5th Marines is the adopted U.S. Marine Corps unit of Costa Mesa. "Patrol Base Jaker" is a documentary of the deployment of the 1/5 to Afghanistan in 2009-10. These films usually center on combat operations. But this one zeros in on the vital aftermath of combat: helping the local population to build a secure life. This film pulls no punches in presenting the complaints of the villagers. The Marines have pushed out the Taliban fighters who took over the area, but severe challenges remain.
NEWS
By Joseph Serna, joseph.serna@latimes.com | June 11, 2011
The Irvine City Council on Tuesday could become the latest Orange County city to consider a citywide ordinance banning sex offenders from going to public parks. The proposal comes on the heels of the Orange County Board of Supervisors approving an ordinance in April prohibiting registered offenders from county parks. Since then, Costa Mesa, Huntington Beach, Laguna Beach and other cities have started researching similar laws at the local level. Westminster approved such an ordinance in May, making it a misdemeanor for offenders to visit parks there.
NEWS
By Candice Baker | April 6, 2011
Help local dogs while scoring designer sunglasses at Kaenon Polarized's third annual Sup for a Pup from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday at 864 W. 16th St., Newport Beach. Savings will be up to 50% off retail on shades, footwear, surf apparel and more; a portion of the proceeds will benefit the A Wish for Animals Foundation. Wahoo's Fish Tacos will be on hand, along with raffles and music. Those who adopt a dog onsite will receive a gift bag and discounts on future product purchases. Visit kaenon.com . Try a 'crazy' new side Costa Mesa-based El Pollo Loco has released three new premium side dish options — corn, corn cake and sweet potato fries — and will offer a free large side with any family meal purchase through June 24 to increase buzz about them.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | April 5, 2011
SANTA ANA — Newport Harbor will be affected by the Orange County Board of Supervisors' Tuesday decision to prohibit registered sex offenders from county-owned recreation areas. "We're setting up a safety zone by keeping parks and recreational areas safe from predators," said Orange County Dist. Atty. Tony Rackauckas. However, privately owned boats cruising in harbors most likely will not be affected, he said. Under the new ordinance, registered sex offenders cannot, without official written permission, enter a county-owned, leased or maintained area where "children regularly gather.
NEWS
By Sarah Peters, sarah.peters@latimes.com | March 16, 2011
COSTA MESA — The number of torn and dirty temporary banners hanging from local businesses has spurred new restrictions on temporary signs. A citywide ordinance that took effect last month requires businesses to secure permits before they can hang banners. The regulations provide strict limits on banners for commercial, industrial, institutional and residential properties, said Ed Fawcett, Costa Mesa Chamber of Commerce president. The issue is one of aesthetics, Fawcett said.
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