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If convicted, Hubbard would lose job, credentials

The criminal process, including a possible appeal, would have to be complete before a credential is revoked, state official says.

December 31, 2011|By Britney Barnes

Embattled Newport-Mesa Unified Supt. Jeffrey Hubbard would lose his job and teaching and administrative credentials if found guilty after his upcoming trial, according to district and state policies.

Although school districts can decide not to require a credential for a superintendent, Newport-Mesa Unified and the state Education Code bar employing a superintendent who has lost his or hers.

District spokeswoman Laura Boss declined to comment for this article.

Hubbard, who has declined to comment until his trial is over, is awaiting trial for three charges of felony misappropriation of public funds related to a period of his employment as superintendent of the Beverly Hills Unified School District in 2005-06.

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He has pleaded not guilty to all charges, and is expected to begin trial Friday in Los Angeles County Superior Court.

Hubbard, who took on Newport-Mesa's top position in May 2006, holds a Life Single Subject Teaching Credential and a Clear Administrative Services Credential, according to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing. The agency is tasked with the licensing and credentialing of educators, the discipline of credential holders and serves as the standards board for public educator preparation.

The commission is required to automatically revoke credentials for the conviction of a number of crimes, including felony misappropriation of public funds, said Nanette F. Rufo, the general counsel and director of the Commission on Teacher Credentialing's division of professional practices, in an email.

If Hubbard is found guilty, his credentials wouldn't be revoked until after the criminal appeals process is complete, or after the time period to appeal has lapsed, Rufo said.

From a credentialing standpoint, nothing would happen in the time period between conviction to the completion of the criminal process, she said.

"The commission is only authorized to take action when the conviction is final," Rufo said in a phone interview.

Educators whose credentials have been revoked can apply to have them reinstated one year later.

Hubbard is accused of giving illegal bonuses to two subordinates: Karen Anne Christiansen, a former Beverly Hills administrator who has since been convicted, and Nora Roque, a former Beverly Hills administrator who now works for Newport-Mesa Unified as director of classified personnel.

Hubbard, prosecutors contend, allegedly gave bonuses without the required school board approval of about $20,000 and a raise in car allowance to Christiansen, and an illegal pay raise to Roque.

Roque has not been accused of any wrongdoing.

Christiansen was found guilty in November of conflict-of-interest charges, and is scheduled to be sentenced Thursday.

britney.barnes@latimes.com

Twitter: @britneyjbarnes

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