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The Crowd: Nothing lovelier than a bride

August 18, 2010|By B.W. Cook
  • I DO, I DO: James Casello marries Cerise Jadwin-Feeley in an intimate ceremony followed by luncheon at Bayside Restaurant.
I DO, I DO: James Casello marries Cerise Jadwin-Feeley… (LORI SHEPLER, Daily…)

The bride wore a fitted, gold lace, rhinestone-encrusted mermaid gown, plunging sweetheart neckline and a rhinestone studded sheer gold veil created by Celine of Corona del Mar. She was a show-stopper as any bride, even in the simplest white traditional gown, wants to be on her wedding day.

Cerise Jadwin-Feeley, one of Newport Beach's most glamorous socialites, married attorney James Casello in what was a remarkably understated and intimate family ceremony and luncheon on a recent Sunday afternoon. The bride was the ultimate exception to the understated theme of the day, which began with a Jewish wedding ceremony at the University Synagogue, Irvine, officiated by Rabbi Arnold Rachlis. His unions marry couples sharing with the congregation explanations of 5,000-year-old Biblical Jewish wedding traditions including a portion of the ceremony known as the Seven Wedding Blessings.

Rachlis blessed Cerise and Jim under the white wedding canopy adorned very simply at its base with white hydrangeas and green ferns. He recited the Seven Blessings: "May your marriage enrich your lives. May you work together to build a relationship of substance and quality. May the honesty of your communication build understanding, connection and trust. May you respect each others' individual personality and philosophy and give each other room to grown and fulfill each others' dreams. May your sense of humor and playful spirit continue to enliven your relationship. May you understand that neither one of you is perfect; you are both subject to human frailties and may your love strengthen when you fall short of each others expectations. May you be the best of friends; better together than either of you are apart."

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Rachlis told the congregation that in Jewish tradition the bride and groom are considered royalty. No matter their position in life, on their wedding day everything is all about the two of them.

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