Advertisement
(Page 3 of 3)

Fruit trees with no fruit

The Coastal Gardener

July 02, 2010|Ron Vanderhoff

This is especially common with stone fruits like plums, pluots and apricots, but also with apples and pears. Fruiting trees require different pruning strategies than ornamental trees. Apples and apricots, for instance, bear fruit on the same spurs year after year. Pruning all the little dead-looking stubs off the tree in winter is a sure way to guarantee no fruit the following year. Peaches, lemons, pomegranates, avocados, oranges, figs, persimmons, etc. – they're all pruned differently.

Ask Ron

I need some suggestions for plant in rather deep shade. I've tried camellias, impatiens, azaleas and a few others, but they haven't done very well.

Lauren, Huntington Beach

Answer: If you have deep shade you will need to be very selective. A few plants to consider are fatsia, aucuba, mahonia, osmanthus, clivia, ligularia, pachysandra and several ferns, such as giant chain fern, sword fern and holly fern. A woodland effect with some of these blended to contrast their foliage patterns and growth habits can be quite soothing and beautiful. If the area is warm enough in the winter you can add some indoor plants for a splash of color, such as spathiphyllum (peace lily), variegated pothos and various brightly colored crotons.

Advertisement

ASK RON your toughest gardening questions, and the expert nursery staff at Roger's Gardens will come up with an answer. Please include your name, phone number and city, and limit queries to 30 words or fewer. E-mail stumpthegardener@rogersgardens.com, or write to Plant Talk at Roger's Gardens, 2301 San Joaquin Hills Road, Corona del Mar, 92625.

Daily Pilot Articles Daily Pilot Articles
|
|
|