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The Political Landscape:

DeVore campaign up to $1M

Mostly small donations have contributed to his coffers. He says the public is unhappy with the Democrats’ performance and the economy.

December 02, 2009|By Brianna Bailey and Mona Shadia

Assemblyman Chuck DeVore has raised more than $1 million — mostly in small donations — in his quest to unseat Sen. Barbara Boxer in 2010, the lawmaker said Wednesday.

The DeVore campaign has culled about 17,000 small contributions from individual donors, mostly totaling about $50 each, DeVore said.

“This is good because it shows a broad base of support from a lot of people who are just average voters,” DeVore said.

DeVore credits the state’s high unemployment rate and a mounting dissatisfaction with the nation’s Democratic lawmakers for his growing support, as well as his innovative online fundraising strategies, he said.

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DeVore’s Senate campaign picked up a Shorty Award earlier this year for its use of the social networking utility Twitter. The awards honor the most innovative uses of Twitter.

DeVore hopes to raise another $100,000 toward his campaign by the end of the year.

DeVore first must do battle with former Hewlett-Packard executive Carly Fiorina in the June Republican primary before taking on Boxer. With her widespread name recognition and vast personal wealth, Fiorina is considered by many to be the favorite in the primary, although DeVore is showing well in early polls.

Resident upset about Fairview Adams intersection

Rick McCormick, a longtime Costa Mesa resident, scolded city staff before the council during Tuesday’s meeting.

McCormick said he has been getting the run-around in the city since August when he called to alert the city about the danger the intersection at Fairview Road and Adams Avenue poses for bikers and drivers.

He said he made a total of 15 to 20 calls to the city, to no avail.

When he no longer knew what to do, he decided to speak to the council.

In August, the city did some construction at the intersection of Fairview and Adams. The new crosswalk is no longer parallel to Fairview and numerous blind spots like trees and a telephone pole can easily cause an accident, McCormick said.

McCormick, a commercial driver who said he has no traffic violations or accidents, almost hit a child on a bicycle while driving south on Fairview to make a right on Adams.

“What would happen with a driver who’s not as alert and drives defensively?”

McCormick told the council members he was disappointed with their staff.

On Wednesday, a city staff member met with McCormick at the intersection and promised to address the issue, he said.


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